Thursday, July 23, 2020

Roamler

Roamler One of the interviews we did during our Europe-trip was an interview with both co-founders of  Amsterdams start-up called Roamler   Wiggert de Haan and Martijn Nijhuis. The idea of Roamler as a start-up to collect location based insights for market research purposes.We asked Wiggert and Martijn about their path to an entrepreneur, about the business model of Roamler, and the market development of the market research over the last years. Both co-founders shared also their advices for the first time entrepreneurs.Martin: Hi, today we are in the beautiful Amsterdam with Roamler. Who are you and what do you do?Wiggert: I am Wiggert de Haan, co-founder of Roamler, and together with my friend we tried to build a global workforce for small tasks.Martijn: Yeah, and I am Martijn. With Roamler we collect and report location based insights. Therefore, we use a very intelligent, smartphone-based platform, and we use thousands of people, consumer like you and me that use this smartphone technolo gy to collect all these insights, report them to us, and then make money with it. Three years ago we were one of the first companies that really made it possible for consumers to make money with their iPhone, which was pretty unique.Martin: Can you walk us through the business model. How does it work technically, I know that people download the app, what do they do with it?Martijn: I don’t think we would worry with all the technical stuff, but the principle is very pretty easy. If our customer, like a big fast-moving brand, wants to know of 500 supermarket locations whether their product is on the shelf, available, then we just drill that down to a very small task that we make available in all the supermarkets. The Roamler consumer picks it up in his smartphone, he gets a notification once he passes the supermarket, and says, okay I can go into the supermarket, count the number of products of this brand, and I take a picture of it, and he gets all the information, he sends it thro ugh the app. Then we have a validation team, reviewing team, and they say you did your job well or you didn’t do well, if he did it well he gets accepted, our Roamler, the consumer, gets his couple of Euros, and our customer directly online gets the insights reported in an online portal. So that’s a little bit of the process. If you talk from the financial point of view, Roamler gets its credits, like two, three, four Euros for an audit, and our customer pays a little bit more, and the rest is to invest in our business.Martin: So basically there is a two sided model. First you need to acquire some individuals like having some app installs, and then on the other hand you do require someone to be the customer. How do you manage this kind of balance, because if you go to the corporate and tell them you could use our services but right now we don’t have a lot of individuals using our platform, or the other way round, how do you make this model work with having the two sides availa ble?Wiggert: In the beginning it is the chicken and egg problem of course. But you can start by putting in the task yourself. So in the beginning when we started here in Amsterdam we put down tasks for all the different locations and allowing the community to grow. And once we had a community base it was very interesting for fast-moving consumer goods manufacturers. You don’t need too many Roamlers to have a workforce. If you have a couple of thousand Roamlers per country you can do very well.Martin: Okay, but did you focus on specific cities first on specific areas in the Netherlands?Martijn: In the Nether lands we started with nationwide.Martin: Okay. Because I would have assumed that you would have to generate a specific density in one place so you can sell this kind of dense network to fast-moving consumer companies, for example?Martijn: Well, the Netherlands is one dense area. It’s pretty densely populated throughout the country. It’s a different story in Germany, for ins tance, or in Chili, in South America, where we are also active, there’s like two big cities, one in the center and one up in the North, and that’s like 80% of the economy. So it is a totally different landscape there as compared to Holland. And there we do a city by city approach. In Holland we did just a national rollout at once.Martin: How do you acquire the individual customers? How do you generate the app installs?Wiggert: Pretty much there they acquire it themselves. We like to have a system where they can find other Roamler, so as a Roamler you can find another Roamler, and by doing this the Roamler tells the story of Roamler to the other Roamler, making sure that the conversion is as high as possible. Because before you’re allowed to do commercial tasks, tasks that we could have for our customers, you have to do ten tasks to really get to know the system, and we go to their boot camp, and if you are failing during a boot camp, it’s not a win for us of course. So the b etter you know about the concept before you start, the better chances are you can get to level two where you can do commercial tasks.Martijn: Then there is one other thing. At least in Holland, but in very many countries that we’re active in, if you start telling consumers that they can make money with their iPhone or their smartphone just by performing very easy workaround tasks, you don’t need to say too much more to convince them to join the crowd. People like to earn an extra buck.Martin: And they’re simple tasks, as you said, just taking pictures?Martijn: It’s simple, and it’s also convenient because you have to go to the supermarket to get your groceries, so we just invite you once you’re there toâ€"Martin: Pay for your grocery.Martijn: Yeah, we make it a little bit easier for you, and you just have to go to the soda shelf or the beer shelf or the diaper shelf, take some notes, make a picture, and that’s it.Martin: Great. Let’s talk briefly about the corporate strategy. Who do you perceive are your biggest competitors in Europe or in the Netherlands? And what does it take to outperform them?Martijn: In Europe when we started there was no competition. There were two initiatives in the US which were similar to ours, they started a couple of months earlier. In Europe there was nothing, so it was a very luxury situation, but then again we were not Europe, we were in Holland. Then about nine months later there was a first copy concept in Holland, they’re still a competitor. And during the past three years, ten, fifteen, twenty initiatives have started throughout Europe. At the moment most of the competition is local, and we know the way that we can keep in front of them, stay in front of them, it’s just to really get the European footprint, because we are convinced that we are still Europe’s biggest player in terms of coverage. If we really have a solid footprint throughout Europe then we will remain and become more interesting for our c ustomers who are also very regional orientated.Martin: So is it that fast-moving consumer goods companies are more global, that’s why they want to have this kind of global footprint and access, because they want to look at the stores in Germany, Italy, etc., and if you have people using your app there then this is the competitive advantage, that’s why you want to scale very fast in these kinds of areas?Wiggert: I think so. Scale is an advantage, and also we see a lot of competitors focusing more on the infrastructure, having also a broad variety of applications. I think here again focus is key as well, so focus on retail, focus on really what the marketing manager is worrying about, or the people responsible for on-shelf availability. Also having a closer fit to your business, something that we really try to do. At least for some of the competitors we see they have greater infrastructure, for example you have to review the task yourself, which is fine, but I think it is having a bit of focus or different focus works for us.Martin: How did the corporates do their market research four or five years ago when no company like yours existed in Europe?Martijn: Market research is about locations based insights which we focus on. They didn’t do it. Or they used their own field force for it, or their hired field force, which was very expensive. To give you an explanation â€" which was also the explanation for this business model â€" in my previous company we had a project in which on a monthly basis we had to visit three hundred random bus stations to collect some data from those bus stations. We did that with physical people that we put in the car with a Tom Tom Sat Nav, with a picture camera, with a question list, all that was collected and sent to the office, then data entry, you can imagine it’s pretty time and money intensive. That’s how we did that before.Wiggert: Now you can do it in a single morning.Martijn: Yeah, now you can do it in a single morning. So we cut out a lot of staff, we cut out personnel, we don’t need staff anymore, we cut out mileage, people don’t have to drive to a specific location because we know that you are in the vicinity of the location already. So we cut out the most expensive parts of that process, and time of course.Martin: And it’s variable.Wiggert: Yes. I think all the competitors in the market are companies like GFK, companies that provide retail insights, although they are focused most of the time on consumer research and consumer data, that will be something that they will do as well, and we can deliver it at a fraction of their price.Martin: How big is this location based market in Netherlands or in Europe?Martijn: I’ve no idea. No, really, it’s big. We can look at our revenue, but that’s not the market. I think where we are now it can be at times five to ten in the Netherlands. It doesn’t tell you anything but it is alike an indication. I really can’t put a number on it. It can be a hundred million Mark, it can be a billion Mark, I really am not sure.Wiggert: And still a market that needs to be created as well. I think that the thing we’re doing, since it’s more accessible for companies, we are creating a market that wasn’t there. So we’ll have to see how big we can get the market.Martin: We share some very cool insights with our readers based on your personal experience. You wanted to share some experience on what sales errors first time entrepreneurs are making or that sales is very important, and the second thing is that every entrepreneur should focus on staying fit and healthy. What can you tell us for the first point?Martijn: Well, we can start lecturing sales for hours. [chuckles] It is not that we know the exact number or the recipe, but we know not only from this company but also from other companies that we have had before, you can have a brilliant idea, product, technical concept, whatever you have, it doesn’t come to the market without anybody selling it. So sales is in our DNA so it’s the first step. We take sales very seriously in terms of the entire process. It’s like written in a book, we follow the rules as far as creating your segmentation, who are your prospective customers, put them on the list, make a sales script, and start making phone calls. Of course you start with a playfield of people that you know, but you run out of them at some point. So they really have to just follow the rules, make phone calls, learn from each phone call and make your next phone call better. Make volumes, don’t spend your day making five phone calls, make thirty phone calls or fifty phone calls. And then it is all going to be sales funneled, then you have a thousand phone calls, and then you have business meetings, you have follow-up meetings, you negotiate, and then all of sudden you have ten customers. The better you get at managing that process, the higher your conversion will be. I think we did a good job but we coul d do way better if we invested more in sales right from the beginning three years ago. We advise it to our partners too. So we tell them this is your framework business guys, you need project management, and you need community management, you need finance, blah, blah, blah, but sales is at the top. Even before you go live in your country you have to take a three-month period to initiate sales with two people.Martin: What do you advise technical firms, because in Europe most firms are technically based. How can they change their mindset or maybe find another co-founder who has this kind of sales mindset?Wiggert: I think that’s maybe the solution, find another co-founder who really goes for marketing, because when we started Roamler we actually got the idea December 30th, and before we made an agreement with each other that we need to find customers before we go live, because we were both running quite a successful company. We did not want to leave the other companies when there was nothing to go to. So we decided we don’t need to be customers, we need to have this proof concept, both technical and businesswise. So selling is something that we really started from the beginning.Martijn: Yeah. We even had the first contract before we even had the app. We just had a PowerPoint slide and just some drawings, and we just told imaginary stories. And I think that’s another thing for technical startups, don’t only start selling once you think it’s ready, that’s some kind of fear that a lot of people have, “It’s not ready, it’s not read yet, so I’m not going to talk to people because it’s not ready yet.” We said we have an idea, on February 1st 2011 we had a phone call, he called me and he said if you’re not going to do anything with it I am going to take that business. I said, okay, if you’re not going to do it I’m going to the business. So we joined forces. And then we just went to potential clients and we just told them imaginary stories. Imagine that we can market research locations relevant for you within two days. And they were like, “What? If you can do that, we might be your partner.” We said, okay, we think we can do that. So, especially for technical startups, start sharing it before it’s even on the table. Just tell your idea, and the sharing also goes with sharing the entire cake. I see a lot of fear where people say I have this brilliant idea and then they talk to family and friends about it, and then they might get as far as saying we have to get somebody who works it out with you, but I’m not giving away my share and it’s mine and blah, blah, blah, the possessive attitude. And I think that kills everything, because if you start sharing it, not only by telling the story but also sharing it literally by saying you know how to sell, you’re good at sales, so you take a piece of the cake, because the cake eventually starts growing.Martin:   If you can’t sell a product then your company is worth z ero, and 100% of zero is less than something of a bigger cake. You do a lot of sports Martijn. Tell us what you would advise first-time entrepreneurs to do for staying physically and mentally fit?Wiggert: That’s a tip that I got three years ago from another entrepreneur who I told about Roamler and the adventure that we were starting, and he said there is a lot of things going to happen if this becomes a successful startup, the world will be all over you and you will be flying in the air, it’s very hard to keep your feet on the ground, blah, blah, blah, and other things might happen. He said there is only one thing that really matters â€" stay fit. And stay fit in terms of physical fitness, not over weight, eat well, do a lot of sports, but also mentally fit, take your rest, even start meditating. I don’t really meditate on a regular basis, but I try, and especially now I’m in a very active mode in terms of sports. It’s all relative, because it’s where I came from. But i f you do nothing then you will lose. I do more now, but I really start feeling the benefits in terms of sleeping well, in terms of having the feeling that I work less and produce more. I think it’s one of the most important lesson for life, but especially for entrepreneurs who really come like bull’s eye with an idea and then everybody is all over them and then it is very difficult to keep your feet on the ground and really stay fit.So we’ve had an initiative in this company where a friend if ours started this seven day recharge programs, and we decided to join that program with the entire company. That program consist of just conscious living throughout one week, which is pretty easy, seven day. But it came down to no coffee, no alcohol, a lot of exercising, meditation, yoga, no connectivity in terms of mobile and internet after 8:30 p.m., wake up without snoozing, all small and big stuff which is doable within a week. And after that week some of those aspects just stated to become part of the program. I know that to make a change in your program it takes 21 days, but seven days is a good start. So conscious living, conscious eating became part of the company.Martin: Okay, thank you very much Martijn and Wiggert for you time.

Friday, May 22, 2020

American History A Multi Faceted Progression Of History

American history is a multi-faceted progression of time that cannot be explained through the simple statements of facts or events. In order to properly understand and analyze American history, one needs to account for the variety of perspectives available throughout history. Most often narratives of American history are written through the perspective of wealthy, elite white men, thus, it is important to also chronicle the history and perspectives of the minorities as well. Thus, in an attempt to properly understand the progression of American history, this essay will aim to compare the accounts of the wealthy elites to the small, non-farmers. In an effort to understand the progression of American history, it is pertinent to begin with†¦show more content†¦The elite class in colonial times was able to afford passage from England, and as such, did not experience indentured servitude. In addition, their wealth allowed them to make suitable husbands for the few women who emigrated, thus the elite class was able to maintain the initial outlook of prosperity in this new world. While there was still a glimmer of hope for economic prosperity for the non-landowning elite, they would have had a less positive outlook on starting a family life, giving their perspective a lower quality of life. Their indentured servitude led to a loss of valuable child bearing years and setbacks in beginning a new life, and as a result their perspective of colonial America is riddled with hardships. Moving forward to the industrial revolution, the gap between the elite upper class and the lower class began to widen. The elite class had always tasted the prosperity, however the introduction of the industrial revolution brought about a life of luxury for the elite class. They began to enjoy an extravagant lifestyle as a result of new technologies such as the power loom and the cotton gin, in essence the rich got richer. The upper classes success in the industrial revolution paints it as an event that changed all of America for the better, however that is not the case for the lower class. For the

Thursday, May 7, 2020

Alzheimer s Disease The Most Known And Common Form Of...

Alzheimer’s is a disease that affects a lot of older people. It not only affects the person but their families, friends, and any loved ones. The disease makes them forget almost everything they have experienced in their life. The memories they have of anything can be almost nil and they will not act like themselves anymore. This disease is a hard disease for someone’s family members to cope with because the person they once knew, is all but gone. In this paper I will be explaining the definition of the Alzheimer’s disease, what comes of the disease, and what treatment options there are. Alzheimer’s disease is a type of severe dementia that causes problems with memory, cognitive ability, the way you think, and the way the person acts.†¦show more content†¦Once the person starts sun-downing they usually become very difficult and hard to manage and can be hard to keep safe. Contrary to belief dementia and Alzheimer’s is not a normal part of aging and getting old. It is a disease that affects a lot of the older population and a large majority are un-diagnosed. There is no known cause or action during life that can cause it, except for getting older and aging Except age isn’t always a factor in this disease. There is early onset Alzheimer’s that can affect someone when they are in their 40’s or 50’s. The brain starts to deteriorate and pretty much destroy itself. They lose the ability to retain memories, speak, and respond to the environment around them. What causes this disease? There is no actual mapped out cause of this disease. It can be congenital and most of the time it is a sudden onset. There are a lot of signs that can let people know that they are starting down that path. A lot of times the actual person doesn’t know its happening though, it usually takes a family member, spouse, or friend to point it out because they see the change first-hand. The disease progresses by the continuous deterioration of the brain tissue. The damaging of the brain tissue breaks down critical centers of the brain that control daily activities. This disease causes memory loss and cannot be regained or new ones be made. It causes them to be a different person and act differently that they would have

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

My First Day at Work Free Essays

Will Fu Interactive: Core Lab 1 February 2010 Interface, defined by the dictionary as a common boundary or interconnection between systems, equipment, concepts, or human beings. It is what allows two very different objects to share a connection. How can the word interface be applied to exhibits at museums? I quickly realized that answer after paying a visit to the American Museum of Natural History. We will write a custom essay sample on My First Day at Work or any similar topic only for you Order Now At the museum, there are these galleries consisting of various taxidermies of animals. Each animal had its own display case and the case was decorated and painted to look as close to its natural habitat as possible. As I stop to look at these animals in their display cases and appreciate the work that the artists put in to emulate its surroundings, I began to feel as if I am in the plains of Africa, standing next to a zebra, or in the deep woods of the Rocky Mountains in front of a Grizzly Bear. I began to imagine what it would be like if I were actually at these places that these animals lived. Then as I walk into the oceanic section, they had the same setup for the marine life. There was this particular showcase that for some reason was so powerful to me that it sent chills down my spine. It was of a whale and a giant squid tangled in a deep-sea battle. The longer I stared at it the more I felt this battle was actually happening in front of me as if any moment, these two animals going to come to life. The reason I chose to talk about these animal showcases is because the way that it made me feel. The animals posed so naturally and the realistic installations served as an interface between me and the deep-sea animals and the wildlife of the jungle. I think these showcases are good examples of interface in museums because it helped me visualize what these places are like in real life. How to cite My First Day at Work, Papers

Monday, April 27, 2020

The Self as a Concept of Identity in the Society

The self is a concept of identity developed from the social setting. This means that an individual acquires identity from the mental reflection of the society (Mead, 2012). Julia Wood illustrates personal identity as a phenomenon developed from the interaction between an individual and the society (Wood, 2007).Advertising We will write a custom research paper sample on The Self as a Concept of Identity in the Society specifically for you for only $16.05 $11/page Learn More As the individual interacts with the society, he or she develops a concept of self. Alternatively, self is an individual’s judgment of the society’s perception towards him or her. Identity is built progressively as one understands other people’s perceptions. Since for one to create an identity, he or she has to imagine other people’s thoughts, imagination is part of self (Cooley, 2011). Other people’s thoughts as imagined by an individual include the society’s perception of one’s own thoughts. One starts to build an identity by interacting with the initial family members or guardians, who are of immediate significant importance. At this point, a child learns that there are other entities with a perception, and is immediately conscious of their perceptions towards them. This is the first instance of creation of self (Mead, 2006). It is notable that the first instance of creation of identity arises from outside the body of an individual. Furthermore, self-perception arises from interaction between the individual and the immediate members of the society. The first people an individual interacts with are identified as particular others. Wood says that even gender orientation is acquired from the perceived expectations of close family members. People slowly assume roles in the society according to the perceived expectations of family members or immediate guardians. A definition of one as an individual is first made by p articular others (Wood, 2007). Self-esteem is based on the nature of utterances by particular others concerning one’s personality. As a child grows, she understands that other people have different perceptions and thoughts. One imagines what other people might be thinking of them and identity becomes a more complex concept. This imagination is known as reflection or self-appraisal. Woods illustrates this using Charles coolers concept of looking-glass reflection (Wood, 2007).Advertising Looking for research paper on communication strategies? Let's see if we can help you! Get your first paper with 15% OFF Learn More This means that the society is a glass mirror through which an individual sees a reflection of oneself. As one develops a more complex identity, a set of guidelines governing one’s life are created. These guidelines are known as identity scripts and they govern beliefs, which are often beyond our ability to influence. When identity has been deve loped up to a certain level, one then learns how to form relationships with others. Every individual has a perception of how one should feel in a relationship with a particular person based on one’s experiences during identity development. The formed attachment with others may be secure or in secure or insecure depending on the past relationships with close family members or guardians (Cooley, 2011). Finally, one develops a concept of self that depends on generalized others, which is a conception of what the society expects of an individual (Wood, 2007). This aspect is characterized by gender roles and responsibilities based on the status of an individual in the society. Different societies lead to development of different self-perceptions, and thus varying nature of identities. In the societies of the west, racial background constitutes identity. Consequently, an individual in the western society is always conscious of his or her color. This perception has been passed on for generations since colonization and slavery began. In the United States, it is common for people to be referred to by the color of their skin, although whites are generally not described by their color since they are often considered normal. Such observations create a perception of difference between races. In almost all societies, gender plays a major role in formation of identity and self. Members of different genders will be treated differently, with males being favored for better opportunities and treatment. While women are expected to have laid back personalities, men are expected to be competition conscious (Wood, 2007). These perceptions are prevalent in all societies with varying degrees of significance. Gender roles and perceptions are developed during growth of a person. Although gender is defined to a significant extent by biological factors, social responses to an individual govern development of certain gender traits.Advertising We will write a custom research pape r sample on The Self as a Concept of Identity in the Society specifically for you for only $16.05 $11/page Learn More Economic and social status can also be a powerful factor influencing the nature of self as created by an individual. For a person who earns minimum wage, it does not seem proper to patronize a five star restaurant or hotel. Such a person will seek the services of a restaurant that offers things that are usually affordable to him or her even when the services to be sought are relatively cheap in all restaurants (Wood, 2007). Since the society has always expected the particular individual to seek the services of a hotel or restaurant offering services to people of a particular social standing, a rich person will feel odd and out of place if he or she seeks the services of a restaurant where most of the patrons are those who earn minimum wages. Moreover, people use comparisons of individuals to gauge their social-economic status (Wood, 2007). An individual will consider oneself successful if his or her performance surpasses that of most people in the society. All the scripts are a result of the influence of generalized other, which is an inherent component of identity in adult life. The mass media influences people’s perspective of self. Culture and expectation of an individual in the social and economic setting are reflected upon by mass media, which disseminates information based on societal expectations. Most programs including movies and publications by dailies are tailored to reflect the society’s expectations by the manner in which the characters shown are depicted (James, 1994). For example, it is unusual for a television program meant to present a real life situation to show scenes of a family setting with members of the family in questions playing reversed roles. Aired television programs will usually reflect the true perceptions and expectations of the society. Famous television personalities influe nce the manner in which an individual relates to people around him or her. In conclusion, the society and the interaction between the society and the individual define self. Gradual learning of the society’s perception of an individual creates identity. Imagination is also a central aspect in creation of self, and an individual will have certain imagination regarding the society’s expectations of his or her person.Advertising Looking for research paper on communication strategies? Let's see if we can help you! Get your first paper with 15% OFF Learn More Thus, this contemporary view of oneself conflicts with classical theories such as Cartesian existentialism, which defines existence by beginning with the perception of self. For Cartesian philosophy, the society is perceived after self-identity has been created. Mirror glass self defines identity as a reflection, where the society acts as the mirror that reflects one’s identity. References Cooley, C. (2011, May 4). The Looking Glass Self. The Work. Retrieved from www2.pfeiffer.edu/~lridener/DSS/INDEX.HTML#cooley James, W. (1994). The Physical Basis of Emotion.. Psychological Review, 101(2), 205-10. Mead, H. (2012, January 1). Geocities.The Self, the I, and the Me. Retrieved from www.geocities.com/tdeddins/Reader288-292pg293- 295.htm Mead, G. G. (2006, February 1). The Self in Society. Pfeiffer. Retrieved from www2.pfeiffer.edu/~lridener/DSS/INDEX.HTML#mead Wood, J. T. (2007). Interpersonal communication: everyday encounters(6th ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Pub.. This research paper on The Self as a Concept of Identity in the Society was written and submitted by user Chad Joseph to help you with your own studies. You are free to use it for research and reference purposes in order to write your own paper; however, you must cite it accordingly. You can donate your paper here.

Thursday, March 19, 2020

Learn the History of the Swastika

Learn the History of the Swastika The swastika is an extremely powerful symbol. The Nazis used it to murder millions of people during the Holocaust, but for centuries it had positive meanings. What is the history of the swastika? Does it now represent good or evil? The Oldest Known Symbol The swastika is an ancient symbol that has been used for over 3,000 years. (That even predates the ancient Egyptian symbol, the Ankh!) Artifacts such as pottery and coins from ancient Troy show that the swastika was a commonly used symbol as far back as 1000 BCE. Nigel Hicks / Getty Images During the following thousand years, the image of the swastika was used by many cultures around the world, including in China, Japan, India, and southern Europe. By the Middle Ages, the swastika was a well known, if not commonly used, symbol, but was called by many different names: China - wanEngland - fylfotGermany - HakenkreuzGreece - tetraskelion and gammadionIndia - swastika Though it is not known for exactly how long, Native Americans also have long used the symbol of the swastika. The Original Meaning The word swastika comes from the Sanskrit svastika: su meaning good, asti meaning to be, and ka as a suffix. Until the Nazis used this symbol, the swastika was used by many cultures throughout the past 3,000 years to represent life, sun, power, strength, and good luck. Even in the early twentieth century, the swastika was still a symbol with positive connotations. For instance, the swastika was a common decoration that often adorned cigarette cases, postcards, coins, and buildings. During World War I, the swastika could even be found on the shoulder patches of the American 45th Division and on the Finnish air force until after World War II. A Change in Meaning In the 1800s, countries around Germany were growing much larger, forming empires; yet Germany was not a unified country until 1871. To counter the feeling of vulnerability and the stigma of youth, German nationalists in the mid-nineteenth century began to use the swastika, because it had ancient Aryan/Indian origins, to represent a long Germanic/Aryan history. By the end of the nineteenth century, the swastika could be found on nationalist German volkisch periodicals and was the official emblem of the German Gymnasts League. In the beginning of the twentieth century, the swastika was a common symbol of German nationalism and could be found in a multitude of places such as the emblem for the Wandervogel, a German youth movement; on Joerg Lanz von Liebenfels antisemitic periodical Ostara; on various Freikorps units; and as an emblem of the Thule Society. Hitler and the Nazis Heinrich Hoffmann / Getty Images In 1920, Adolf Hitler decided that the Nazi Party needed its own insignia and flag. For Hitler, the new flag had to be a symbol of our own struggle as well as highly effective as a poster. (Mein Kampf, pg. 495) On August 7, 1920, at the Salzburg Congress, the red flag with a white circle and black swastika became the official emblem of the Nazi Party. Hulton Archive / Getty Images In Mein Kampf, Hitler described the Nazis new flag: In red we see the social idea of the movement, in white the nationalistic idea, in the swastika the mission of the struggle for the victory of the Aryan man, and, by the same token, the victory of the idea of creative work, which as such always has been and always will be anti-Semitic. (pg. 496-497) Because of the Nazis flag, the swastika soon became a symbol of hate, antisemitism, violence, death, and murder. What Does the Swastika Mean Now? There is a great debate as to what the swastika means now. For 3,000 years, the swastika meant life and good luck. But because of the Nazis, it has also taken on a meaning of death and hate. These conflicting meanings are causing problems in todays society. For Buddhists and Hindus, the swastika is a very religious symbol that is commonly used. Chirag Badlani shares a story about one time when he went to make some photocopies of some Hindu Gods for his temple. While standing in line to pay for the photocopies, some people behind him in line noticed that one of the pictures had a swastika. They called him a Nazi. Unfortunately, the Nazis were so effective at their use of the swastika emblem, that many do not even know any other meaning for the swastika. Can there be two completely opposite meanings for one symbol? Does the Direction of the Swastika Matter? In ancient times, the direction of the swastika was interchangeable, as can be seen on an ancient Chinese silk drawing. Glenn Waters in Japan / Getty Images Some cultures in the past had differentiated between the clockwise swastika and the counter-clockwise sauvastika. In these cultures, the swastika symbolized health and life while the sauvastika took on a mystical meaning of bad-luck or misfortune. Italian summer camp forming group backwards swastika. Â  De Agostini / Foto Studio Leoni / Getty Images But since the Nazis use of the swastika, some people are trying to differentiate the two meanings of the swastika by varying its direction- trying to make the clockwise, Nazi version of the swastika mean hate and death, while the counter-clockwise version would hold the ancient meaning of the symbol, life, and good luck.

Tuesday, March 3, 2020

How to Make Blue Fire with the Easy Method

How to Make Blue Fire with the Easy Method Making blue fire is an easy DIY project, and theres more than one way to do it. Here are a couple of pointers for making it yourself. Natural Blue Fire The easiest way to make blue fire is to burn a chemical that naturally produces a blue flame. Most types of alcohol burn as blue fire:Â   Ethanol (e.g., rum, vodka)Methanol (wood alcohol, Heet fuel treatment)Isopropyl alcohol (rubbing alcohol) Natural gas also burns with a blue flame. Easy Method of Making Blue Fire Several metal salts burn with a blue flame, such as certain copper, arsenic, and lead compounds. Antimony and lead are toxic, but you can use copper(I) chloride to produce blue fire. Add a small amount of water to copper(I) chloride to dissolve the salt. If you cannot find copper(I) chloride, it is possible to make this chemical yourself. Copper(II) chloride is more widely available, but it will burn with a blue-green flame.Soak a flammable material with the copper chloride solution. Good choices include sawdust or pine cones.Allow the material to dry.When you light it or add it to a normal fire you will get blue fire.